The Lawbringer: Letters to Rogers, letters to Congress


Pop law abounds in [hide]The Lawbringer[/hide], your weekly dose of WoW, the law, video games and the MMO genre. [hide]Mathew McCurley[/hide] takes you through the world running parallel to the games we love and enjoy, full of rules, regulations, pitfalls and traps. How about you hang out with us as we discuss some of the more esoteric aspects of the games we love to play?

We’ve got two stories to talk about on The Lawbringer today, both interestingly involving letters. That’s right — letters. To you from me, that sort of thing. These letters, however, are instruments of change in a world where we as consumers seem not to have much control or ability to change the big picture concepts that dot our path to consistent entertainment. The amount of energy that we have to put into just getting in a decent WoW session is staggering at times.

The first story revolves around [hide]Rogers[/hide], one of the largest Canadian internet service providers, famous for its lame bandwidth caps and my old Canadian guildmates shouting «Rogers sucks!» as much as they could on Mumble. Yes, it is another chapter in the [hide]Mathew McCurley Guide to Awful Bandwidth Throttling[/hide] — but hopefully, this new information and story chapter will get us on the path to better WoW experiences in the face of the immense throttling of WoW data as peer-to-peer traffic.

The second story is all about letters that you will want to send. [hide]Last week[/hide], I wrote The Lawbringer about Senate Bill S.978, colloquially being referred to as the anti-streaming bill. While not directly prohibiting video game streaming or even mentioning video games anywhere in the proposed legislation, video games are nonetheless obliterated in the crossfire of the entertainment industry and would-be illegal streamers making millions off of pirated entertainment, movies, music, and more. The [hide]Entertainment Consumers Association[/hide] has begun a letter-writing campaign to inform and implore Congress to not pass a bill with such broad and language lacking description.[hide]Continue reading The Lawbringer: Letters to Rogers, letters to Congress[/hide]Filed under: [hide]Analysis / Opinion[/hide], [hide]The Lawbringer[/hide][hide]The Lawbringer: Letters to Rogers, letters to Congress[/hide] originally appeared on [hide]WoW Insider[/hide] on Fri, 15 Jul 2011 14:00:00 EST. Please see our [hide]terms for use of feeds[/hide].[hide]Permalink[/hide] | [hide]Email this[/hide] | [hide]Comments[/hide]
Pop law abounds in [hide]The Lawbringer[/hide], your weekly dose of WoW, the law, video games and the MMO genre. [hide]Mathew McCurley[/hide] takes you through the world running parallel to the games we love and enjoy, full of rules, regulations, pitfalls and traps. How about you hang out with us as we discuss some of the more esoteric aspects of the games we love to play?

We’ve got two stories to talk about on The Lawbringer today, both interestingly involving letters. That’s right — letters. To you from me, that sort of thing. These letters, however, are instruments of change in a world where we as consumers seem not to have much control or ability to change the big picture concepts that dot our path to consistent entertainment. The amount of energy that we have to put into just getting in a decent WoW session is staggering at times.

The first story revolves around [hide]Rogers[/hide], one of the largest Canadian internet service providers, famous for its lame bandwidth caps and my old Canadian guildmates shouting «Rogers sucks!» as much as they could on Mumble. Yes, it is another chapter in the [hide]Mathew McCurley Guide to Awful Bandwidth Throttling[/hide] — but hopefully, this new information and story chapter will get us on the path to better WoW experiences in the face of the immense throttling of WoW data as peer-to-peer traffic.

The second story is all about letters that you will want to send. [hide]Last week[/hide], I wrote The Lawbringer about Senate Bill S.978, colloquially being referred to as the anti-streaming bill. While not directly prohibiting video game streaming or even mentioning video games anywhere in the proposed legislation, video games are nonetheless obliterated in the crossfire of the entertainment industry and would-be illegal streamers making millions off of pirated entertainment, movies, music, and more. The [hide]Entertainment Consumers Association[/hide] has begun a letter-writing campaign to inform and implore Congress to not pass a bill with such broad and language lacking description.[hide]Continue reading The Lawbringer: Letters to Rogers, letters to Congress[/hide]Filed under: [hide]Analysis / Opinion[/hide], [hide]The Lawbringer[/hide][hide]The Lawbringer: Letters to Rogers, letters to Congress[/hide] originally appeared on [hide]WoW Insider[/hide] on Fri, 15 Jul 2011 14:00:00 EST. Please see our [hide]terms for use of feeds[/hide].[hide]Permalink[/hide] | [hide]Email this[/hide] | [hide]Comments[/hide]

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